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Jude
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Josephus
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Who was Josephus?
Maps & Graphics
Greek Texts
Texts to note

THE JEWISH WAR
War, Volume 1
War, Volume 2
War, Volume 3
War, Volume 4
War, Volume 5
War, Volume 6
War, Volume 7

ANTIQUITIES
Ant. Jud., Bk 1
Ant. Jud., Bk 2
Ant. Jud., Bk 3
Ant. Jud., Bk 4
Ant. Jud., Bk 5
Ant. Jud., Bk 6
Ant. Jud., Bk 7
Ant. Jud., Bk 8
Ant. Jud., Bk 9
Ant. Jud., Bk 10
Ant. Jud., Bk 11
Ant. Jud., Bk 12
Ant. Jud., Bk 13
Ant. Jud., Bk 14
Ant. Jud., Bk 15
Ant. Jud., Bk 16
Ant. Jud., Bk 17
Ant. Jud., Bk 18
Ant. Jud., Bk 19
Ant. Jud., Bk 20
OTHER
Vs Apion, Bk 1
Vs Apion, Bk 2
Life/Autobiog.


Apocrypha
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Introduction

Gospel of--
-- Nicodemus
-- Peter
-- Ps-Matthew
-- James (Protevangelium)
-- Thomas (Infancy)
-- Thomas (Gnostic)
-- Joseph of Arimathea
-- Joseph_Carpenter
Pilate's Letter
Pilate's End

Apocalypse of --
-- Ezra
-- Moses
-- Paul
-- Pseudo-John
-- Moses
-- Enoch

Various
Clementine Homilies
Clementine Letters
Clementine Recognitions
Dormition of Mary
Book of Jubilees
Life of Adam and Eve
Odes of Solomon
Pistis Sophia
Secrets of Enoch
Tests_12_Patriarchs
Veronica's Veil
Vision of Paul
Vision of Shadrach

Acts of
Andrew
Andrew & Matthias
Andrew & Peter
Barnabas
Bartholomew
John
Matthew
Paul & Perpetua
Paul & Thecla
Peter & Paul
Andrew and Peter
Barnabas
Philip
Pilate
Thaddaeus
Thomas in India

Whole Year

SUNDAYS
Advent
Christmastide
Lenten Sundays
Sundays of Easter
Ordinary Time (A)
Sundays, 1-34, Year A
Ord.Time (Year B)
Sundays, 1-34, Year B
Ord.Time (Year C)
Sundays, 1-34, Year C

WEEKDAYS
Advent
Lent
Eastertide
Ordinary Time
Weeks 1-11 (Year 1)
Weeks 1-11 (Year 2)
Wks 12-22 (Year 1)
Wks 12-22 (Year 2)
Wks 23-34 (Year 1)
Wks 23-34 (Year 2)

OTHER
Solemnities
Funerals
Weddings


Patristic
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Clement of Rome

Ignatius of Antioch

Polycarp of Smyrna

Barnabas,(Epistle of)

Papias of Hierapolis

Justin, Martyr

The Didachë

Irenaeus of Lyons

Hermas (Pastor of)

Tatian of Syria

Theophilus of Antioch

Diognetus (letter)

Athenagoras of Alex.

Clement of Alexandria

Tertullian of Carthage

Origen of Alexandria



Getting Started

Introductory readings in Josephus

While the whole of his writing corpus is important for classical and biblical studies, some passages in Josephus are of special interest even to the general reader. It may help if we list and introduce a number of these passages, hoping to whet the student's appetite for more extensive browsing within the works of this first-century Jewish historian.

Among the volumes of the Jewish War, Volume One is of vital importance as our main source for Jewish history in the period from Alexander of Macedon to the start of the Christian era.

The final volume (7) of the War includes the tragic destruction of Jerusalem, the siege of Masada and the triumph celebrated in Rome at the conclusion of the war.

Clearly, one will need to read the Autobiography for an understanding of how Josephus sees his own place within Judaism, despite his having surrendered to Vespasian and going to Rome as a pensioner of the Flavian household and living a life of leisured culture on the side of the Palatine hill in the heart of imperial Rome.

While there are many fascinating vignettes in the twenty volumes of his Antiquities of the Jews, one might wish to start with the passages in volume 18 about John the Baptist and Jesus and then go to his description of the early career of Herod the Great, in volume 14, which illustrates his father's friendship with Julius Caesar and Herod's own loyal association with Mark Antony, despite the desire of Cleopatra to gain control of Palestine. Going back to volume 1, we find Josephus' re-telling of the patriarchal stories, often adding little details of Jewish folklore that are not found in the Bible.

In telling the story of Joseph in Egypt in volume 2 he typically elaborates on the moral aspects of Joseph's dilemma - since he wishes to commend the sensitive Jewish moral code to his educated Roman readers. Similarly, he lays great stress on the moral majesty of Moses, and on the divine providence that guided his survival at birth and then his early years in Pharao's household.

Click here for passages of special interest in his two major works. Students will note specific episodes and speeches that illustrate the advocacy skill with which Josephus wrote, to persuade the Roman aristocracy of his day to respect the ancient religion of the Jews and treat them as a special case, worthy of exemption from the duty of emperor-worship, which was quite anathema to them, even though they can be admirable citizens of the empire in all other respects.

Patrick Rogers