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Josephus
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Who was Josephus?
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Greek Texts
Texts to note

THE JEWISH WAR
War, Volume 1
War, Volume 2
War, Volume 3
War, Volume 4
War, Volume 5
War, Volume 6
War, Volume 7

ANTIQUITIES
Ant. Jud., Bk 1
Ant. Jud., Bk 2
Ant. Jud., Bk 3
Ant. Jud., Bk 4
Ant. Jud., Bk 5
Ant. Jud., Bk 6
Ant. Jud., Bk 7
Ant. Jud., Bk 8
Ant. Jud., Bk 9
Ant. Jud., Bk 10
Ant. Jud., Bk 11
Ant. Jud., Bk 12
Ant. Jud., Bk 13
Ant. Jud., Bk 14
Ant. Jud., Bk 15
Ant. Jud., Bk 16
Ant. Jud., Bk 17
Ant. Jud., Bk 18
Ant. Jud., Bk 19
Ant. Jud., Bk 20
OTHER
Vs Apion, Bk 1
Vs Apion, Bk 2
Life/Autobiog.


Apocrypha
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Introduction

Gospel of--
-- Nicodemus
-- Peter
-- Ps-Matthew
-- James (Protevangelium)
-- Thomas (Infancy)
-- Thomas (Gnostic)
-- Joseph of Arimathea
-- Joseph_Carpenter
Pilate's Letter
Pilate's End

Apocalypse of --
-- Ezra
-- Moses
-- Paul
-- Pseudo-John
-- Moses
-- Enoch

Various
Clementine Homilies
Clementine Letters
Clementine Recognitions
Dormition of Mary
Book of Jubilees
Life of Adam and Eve
Odes of Solomon
Pistis Sophia
Secrets of Enoch
Tests_12_Patriarchs
Veronica's Veil
Vision of Paul
Vision of Shadrach

Acts of
Andrew
Andrew & Matthias
Andrew & Peter
Barnabas
Bartholomew
John
Matthew
Paul & Perpetua
Paul & Thecla
Peter & Paul
Andrew and Peter
Barnabas
Philip
Pilate
Thaddaeus
Thomas in India

Whole Year

SUNDAYS
Advent
Christmastide
Lenten Sundays
Sundays of Easter
Ordinary Time (A)
Sundays, 1-34, Year A
Ord.Time (Year B)
Sundays, 1-34, Year B
Ord.Time (Year C)
Sundays, 1-34, Year C

WEEKDAYS
Advent
Lent
Eastertide
Ordinary Time
Weeks 1-11 (Year 1)
Weeks 1-11 (Year 2)
Wks 12-22 (Year 1)
Wks 12-22 (Year 2)
Wks 23-34 (Year 1)
Wks 23-34 (Year 2)

OTHER
Solemnities
Funerals
Weddings


Patristic
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Clement of Rome

Ignatius of Antioch

Polycarp of Smyrna

Barnabas,(Epistle of)

Papias of Hierapolis

Justin, Martyr

The Didachë

Irenaeus of Lyons

Hermas (Pastor of)

Tatian of Syria

Theophilus of Antioch

Diognetus (letter)

Athenagoras of Alex.

Clement of Alexandria

Tertullian of Carthage

Origen of Alexandria




This Translation

This new translation of Josephus is a labour of love, made between 2001 and 2010, while I was teaching a course on Judaism at Milltown Institute of Theology in Dublin. When I began it, the only English version of Josephus' writings available gratis on the Internet was the one made in the eighteenth century, by William Whiston (1667-1752), entitled The Works of Flavius Josephus (1737). Believing that not only my own students, but many others would find it helpful to have a more readable version online, I set out to make one, based on the Greek of Niese's editio major, as found in Loeb's edition of Josephus (Harvard, 1934ff.) Whiston's 18th century rendering Josephus, while accurate enough, is in a quaint, old-fashioned English, due to its echoing the vocabulary of the King James Bible, and to its rather strict adherence to the word-order and syntax of the Greek original. This updated version aims at a more modern idiom, without neglecting concern for accuracy.


Seven-branched candelstick from the Jerusalem Temple
carried by Titus' soldiers in the triumphal procession of 72 A.D.
Bas-relief from the Arch of Titus, on the Via Sacra, Rome

The paragraph numbers used by Whiston and the verse numbers devised by Benedikt Niese are both included here. While basing myself on the Greek text, I have kept an eye on Whiston's rendering throughout, as well as on the 1940's version in the Loeb edition, when seeking felicitous equivalents to particular phrases.

Numbering System for the works of Josephus

The division of the works of Josephus into chapters is very ancient, and is reflected in citations by Cassiodorus. The sub-division of each chapter into numbered paragraphs goes back at least as far as Whiston's 18th century translation, and may well precede him.

References to texts in Josephus are commonly cited in one of two styles:

1) By book, chapter and paragraph [e.g. Ant. 2.6.9] . [The main difficulty with this older form of citation is that the numbered paragraphs vary greatly in length, from five to more than a hundred lines. In the War, for example, a single paragraph can contain a lengthy speech, running to several pages! ]

2) By book and verse [e.g. Ant. 2.160]. [Here, each verse, rather like a biblical verse, is just a few lines of text, seldom more than two sentences long; each book consists of hundreds of these verses, numbered sequentially. This useful system of subdividing the Greek text into these shorter verses, for the more precise location of particular passages in the text, appears to have been introduced by Benedikt Niese in his critical edition: Flavii Josephi Opera. 7 vols (editio major). Berlin: Weidmann, 1885-1895. Some very long paragraphs consist of numerous verses, only the first of which is indexed here. For an example, see Agrippa's speech, in War 2:345-401]

Both numbering styles are incorporated in this edition:

Style 1) books and chapters are indexed in the Table of Contents [the paragraph numbers, as enumerated in Whiston, are listed in plain text only, and not indexed in any way, in order to avoid confusing them with the far more numerous verse-numbers]

Style 2) the verse-numbers are also kept within the text, for easy reference. Any desired verse can be easily reached using the Search-key: Ctrl-F

It is hoped that this new version may help today's students of Second Temple Jewish history to sample the vitality and creativity, as well as the religious and historical vision of the extraordinary first century recorder, Flavius Josephus.